ROXICODONE VS OXYCODONE

Considering Roxicodone vs Oxycodone

Roxicodone and oxycodone sound like the same drug. They both help relieve pain. Both also belong to the opioid category. But, why do they have two different names? Medications may have availability as either generics or brand names. Such is the case with oxycodone and Roxicodone. Oxycodone is the generic name. Roxicodone is a brand name for the same drug.

In this blog, Harmony Recovery Group looks at the following:

  • Defining what oxycodone is
  • Explaining what Roxicodone is
  • Looking at oxycodone and Roxicodone as opioids
  • Side effects and possible long-term effects of opioid abuse
  • How to get help for opioid abuse and/or addiction

Defining What Oxycodone Is

Oxycodone treats moderate to severe pain. Doctors first started using it in 1917. After WWII, its accepted use spread further. It helped wounded combat veterans after surgery. In reading about oxycodone, you may come across the word “analgesic.” It’s simply a medical term for a medication that eases pain.

Earlier, we mentioned that oxycodone was a generic name. One might also see oxycodone prescribed under the following brand names:

  • Oxycontin
  • Percocet
  • Oxycet
  • Percodan

Explaining What Roxicodone Is

Brand names for oxycodone sometimes pair it with something else. Pharmaceutical companies will combine oxycodone with acetaminophen, aspirin, or ibuprofen. However, Roxicodone is the hydrochloride salt of oxycodone. As with the aforementioned examples, Roxicodone is a brand name of oxycodone.

Looking At Roxicodone vs Oxycodone As Opioids

Both oxycodone and Roxicodone belong to the same drug class. They are opioids. Physicians employ opioids to relieve pain. In media coverage, you may hear the term “opioid” frequently. But we must not think of opioids like oxycodone and Roxicodone as either good or bad. Like all drugs, they are tools. When used correctly, they can help us. But if we abuse them, we may suffer dire consequences.

What Do Opioids Actually Do?

When the brain needs us to do something, it sends out a chemical message. We call these messages neurotransmitters. Opioids act on these neurotransmitters. We even have opioid receptors in our brains. You see, opioids occur naturally inside us. They help us feel better when we get hurt.

Opioid medications primarily influence the neurotransmitter known as dopamine. Dopamine helps motivate us. Whether we want food, a good grade, a new job, or to ask someone out on a date. Dopamine motivates us to pursue that goal. When we achieve something, dopamine rewards us with positive feelings.

Do People Abuse Opioids Like Oxycodone And Roxicodone?

Opioids have legitimate medical uses, especially after someone has surgery. Opioids work well. And, they work quickly. People who take them notice their effects almost immediately. Consequently, opioids have a high probability for abuse. Remember, even someone with a prescription can still abuse that prescription.

Abusing opioids like oxycodone and Roxicodone might look like:

  • Taking more than the prescribed dose
  • Consuming in a way other than the one prescribed (i.e. snorting)
  • Mixing with alcohol or other drugs
  • Giving away or selling a prescription
  • Stealing someone else’s prescription

Side Effects And Possible Long-Term Effects Of Opioid Abuse

Even proper opioid use comes with side effects. Opioids like oxycodone and Roxicodone slow down our brains. As such, they can cause one to become drowsy or sleepy. This makes driving, or operating machinery, very risky. Constipation appears quite commonly. Other side effects of opioid use include nausea and vomiting.

Long-Term Consequences Of Abuse

The longer a person uses an opioid, the more likely they are to become dependent on it. When a person becomes dependent, they must have the drug in order to maintain a sense of balance. If a dependent person does not have their drug, they will suffer withdrawal symptoms. If a person uses opioids to this point, then they likely suffer from opioid use disorder (OUD).

Opioids And The Respiratory System

Taking high doses or opioids becomes incredibly dangerous. As does mixing opioids with other drugs and/or alcohol. When one takes opioids like this, the effects of the opioid amplify. Opioids can slow down the heart rate and lower the body temperature. Therefore, a person’s heart might not beat as often as it ought to. Also, opioids can cause respiratory depression. This means that a person’s breathing slows down too much. Slowing down the breathing and heart rate can damage the brain. More often than not, death results.

How To Get Help For Opioid Abuse or Addiction

We learned that Roxicodone vs oxycodone are essentially the same substance. Oxycodone refers to the generic medication and Roxicodone is the brand name. We examined their role as opioids in pain reduction. Moreover, we investigated common side effects and long-term consequences of opioid abuse.

If you or someone that you love struggles with addiction to either oxycodone or Roxicodone, don’t delay. Get help today. Call or email Harmony recovery Group.